If There Is Much In The Window There Should Be More In The Room

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Fragile Earth From Above~~






Fragile Earth From Above




"Earth From Above" is the result of the aerial photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand's five-year airborne odyssey across six continents. It's a spectacular presentation of large scale photographs of astonishing natural landscapes. Every stunning aerial photograph tells a story about our changing planet.


Yann Arthus-Bertrand, born 1946 in France, has become globally famous as a nature photographer. During his career he discovered the beauty of the world as seen from above when he became a hot air balloon pilot and began experimenting with aerial photography. Besides photography, Yann passionately engages in non-profit projects for different organizations.

By 2005, Arthus-Bertrand created the association GoodPlanet. This international NGO develops numerous projects whose shared objective is to educate about sustainable development and request individuals across every background, culture and border to think beyond the development of our planet and, instead, toward the future of all of its inhabitants.

Earth From Above, a 4-episode, 8-hour TV series then launched in 2007 and renewed for 2008, prompting Arthus-Bertrand to begin filming of Home, a documentary-style feature film about the state of our planet and challenges facing us to protect it. Its simultaneous worldwide release is scheduled for June 5th, 2009 - World Environment Day.

Arthus-Bertrand was a member of the Academy of Fine Arts of the Institute of France in 2006. He is a knight of the Legion of Honour, an Officer of the Order of Agricultural Merit, and an Officer of the National Order of Merit. In 2007, Arthus-Bertrand helped Al Gore present his Academy Award-winning film, An Inconvenient Truth, to the French Parliament.

As an artist, documentarian and advocate, Yann Arthus-Bertrand demonstrates the power of images to convey universal emotion, understanding and shared appreciation for our planet and its inhabitants. For this reason, he is recognized worldwide as one of the most important and respected environmentalists of our time.


Caravan of dromedaries near Tichit, Mauritania

Herd of Hereford cows crossing the Chimehuin river, Argentina
Gullholmen village, north of Göteborg, Sweden



Denver, Colorado

fraser-island-dune-australia

Palácio Nacional da Pena, Portugal

Palácio Nacional da Pena, Portugal

Township in Cap Town, Republic of South Africa

The Inca city of Machu Picchu, Cuzco region, Peru

The medieval city, Dubrovnik, Croatia

Área Residencial, Beijing, China

Maasai Mara National Reserve,Kenya

Open coal mine near Delmas

Wineglass Bay, Tasmania, Australia

Houses on stilts, Makoko shanty town, Lagos, Nigeria

Bazaar of Istanbul, Turkey

Neuschwanstein castle, Bavaria, Germany

Hashima Island, also known as Gunkanjima or “Battleship” Island, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan

Gamla Stan, Stockholm, Sweden

Stranded boat, Aral sea, Aralsk region, Kazakhstan

Add cPalm Jumeirah artificial island, Dubai, United Arab Emiratesaption

Dovecotes at Mit Gahmur, Egypt

Varanasi, the Ghats along the Ganges, Uttar Pradesh, India

Kibbutz of Sha’alvim, near Modi’in, Central District, Israel
solar plant in andalusia spain

Volcano of Rano Raraku, Easter Island, Chile

epicenter of the atomic bomb on hiroshima japan

Mountains near Jengish

los angeles freeways

Louver and Ile de la Cité in Paris, France

American cemetery north of Verdun, Meuse, France

Housing plots at Brøndby, on the outskirts of Copenhagen, Seeland, Denmark

Elephants in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

Favelas in Rio de Janeiro

Ruins of the medieval citadel of Shali in the town of Siwa, Egypt

Start of the Bol d’or race, Leman lake, Switzerland

19.jpg

icebergs and an Adelie penguin, Adelie Land, Antarctica

Agricultural landscape near Cognac, Charente, France

Islet in the terraced rice fields of Bali, Indonesia

The Grand Bazaar, istanbul turkey

Boats-stranded-on-the-dry-Aral-Sea-Kazakhstan

Bora Bora Islands french Polynesia

Dromedary caravan in the dunes, near Nouakchott, Mauritania

Catamaran in the Glénan archipelago, south coast of Finistère, France

Cattle near the Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

Air Terminal 2, Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle Airport, Val-d’Oise, France

Detail of the Gallo-Roman ruins at Pontchartrain, Yvelines Department, France

Dried cracked mud in Camargue, Bouches-du-Rhone, France

EruptionofPitondelaFournaiseReunionIsland

Flight of scarlet ibises near Pedernales

Gardens at the Château of Vaux-le-Vicomte, Seine et Marne, Franc

Gardens of the Château de Villandry, Indre-et-Loire Department, France

The Heart of Voh in 1990, New Caledonia (French Overseas Territory) 1

The Heart of Voh in 1990, New Caledonia (French Overseas Territory

House in Keremma, on the Kernic cove at low tide, Finistère, France

Icebreaker Louis Saint Laurent in Resolute Bay, Nunavut Territory, Canada

Iraqi tank graveyard in the desert near Al Jahrah, Kuwait

Mountainous countryside near Maelifellssandur, Myrdalsjökull Region, Iceland

MilitarycemeteryinVerdunFrance

NaturereserveArguinbankGirondeFrance.
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Naturists of the center of Arnaoutchot, Landes, France
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Dovecotes at Mit Gahmur, Egypt
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PyramidoftheLouvreParisFrance

Road interrupted by a sand dune, Nile Valley, Egypt.

Roped party of mountaineers climbing Mont Blanc, Haute-Savoie Department, France

Kibbutz of Sha’alvim, near Modi’in, Central District, Israel

Subaquatic vegetation in the Loire river near Digoin, Saône-et-Loire, France

Village near Tahoua, Niger

Tasmania, Australia

The Gorges of the Bras de Caverne, island of Reunion, France

The Puy de Dome, Auvergne volcano range, Puy-de-Dome, France

The islets of Nokanhui, south of le des Pins, New Caledonia, France

The largest plant maze in the world, at Reignac-sur-Indre, Indre-et-Loire Department, France

Modern graves in a cemetery at Asyut, Nile valley, Egypt

Town of Koh Pannyi, Phand Nga bay, Thailand

Training arena in the hippodrome of Maisons-Laffitte, Yvelines, France

Trees in the middle of water near Taponas, Rhône region, France

TreesdownedbystormintheforestoftheVosg

Fields of tulips near Lisse, near Amsterdam, Netherlands

Versailles Chateau at sunset,Yvelines, France

Village in the Rheris Valley, Er Rachidia region, High Atlas Mountains, Morocco

White horse of Uffington, Oxfordshire, England

Worker resting on bales of cotton, Thonakaha, Korhogo, Ivory Coast. Cotton crops occupy approximately 335,000 square klilometers worldwide, and use nearly one quarter of all pesticides sold

boats in the port of Mopti on the Niger River, Mali

Iguazu Falls, Argentina and Brazil

Snowmobiles on the ice, Baffin Island, Canada

A whale swims off the Valdes peninsula, Argentina

Palm Jumeirah artificial island, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Marina Bay Sands Casino Singapore

"Tree of life", Tsavo national park, Kenya. This acacia is a symbol of life in the vast expanses of thorny savanna, where wild animals come to take advantage of its leaves or its shade

Mount Pinatubo, a volcano north of Manila, Luzon, Philippines
Village on stilts in Tongkil, Samales Islands, Philippines

Islet, Congo river near Mossaka, Cuvette, Republic of the Congo

Meteora Monastery, Thessaly, Greece

Countryside around Siena, Tuscany, Italy

Tea gardens at Boseong, Jeollanam-do Province, South Korea

Meeting in a stadium, west Seoul, Gyeonggy, South Korea

Botanical garden at Oedo Paradise Island, Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea

Seaweed cultivation off Tongyeong, South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea

Lake Velence, Hungary

Wetland near Surgut, Siberia, Russia

Dairy cows passing between dunes, Maule province, Chile

Moaïs statues, Ahu Tongariki, Easter Island, Chile

Rano Kau volcano in Rapa Nui national park, Easter Island, Chile

Parasols on a beach close to Agia Napa, Famagusta District, Cyprus

Vineyards near Liopetri, Famagusta District, Cyprus
Cotton fabrics drying in the sun, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

Garni Temple, Kotayk Province, Armenia

Royal tombs of Wat Phra si Sanphet (Temple of Sanphet), Ayutthaya, Thailand

Royal Flora Ratchaphruek 2006, annual floralie in Chiang Mai, province of Chiang Mai, Thailand

Wat at Westside of Chiang Mai, province of Chiang Mai, Thaïland

Rice fields north of Pokhara, Nepal

Satellite dishes on the roofs of Aleppo, Syria

Norias on the Orontes River in Hama, Syrie

Dunes near the sea at Khor Al-Abaid, Qatar
Yann Arthus-Bertrand





















*Photographs all owned by Yann Arthus-Bertrand*
Please visit Yann's personal website http://www.yannarthusbertrand.org/

*wallcoo*
*pictureearth.org*




17 comments:

  1. great pictures, thanks for letting us see ......
    I just wonder where the natur is in the NATURIST picture

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am grateful for
    your time here.
    You are more
    than welcome, Joe.

    What is a "naturist picture'?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh, I understand now.
    I take it to mean
    the existing environmental
    challenges presented
    from these photos.
    Photography is Yann's
    means of sharing
    his ideas and convictions.
    The contradiction is
    with the extraordinary
    beauty of the Earth,
    the increasing pressure
    and presence of mankind
    causes harmful changes.
    These aerial images
    are all beautiful,
    but if we step back from things,
    we will see them differently
    and see another reality.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very nice compilation, Better. The first part has me wondering where some of these places are; the second part explains some of them.

    ~M

    ReplyDelete
  5. As close as they are all lying to one another, this must be a Spencer Tunick event.

    ~M

    ReplyDelete
  6. I had no idea that there was this large crater on the island.

    ~M

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you very much, M.
    These are a few
    samples of exquisite
    natural and urban
    sites in currently
    105 countries
    from afghanistan to yemen.

    Any and everyone
    who thinks about
    what the future holds
    for our species
    and all the others
    that share our Home,
    must see this film.
    produced by the brilliant
    and ecology-minded
    French director Luc Besson,
    It is the work of acclaimed
    aerial photographer
    Yann Arthus-Bertrand,
    whose cinematography,
    covering landscapes
    in 54 countries,
    provides a journey
    you’ll never be able
    to experience anywhere else.
    Bertrand’s views of
    Earth from above are
    so powerfully exquisite
    they will bring you to tears.

    Along with its enthralling images,
    the film delivers alarming
    statistics about climate change
    and how quickly it is
    transforming our beautiful
    planet into a place
    that will be uninhabitable.

    The documentary is intended
    to spur you to
    sustainable behavior,
    and ends with some
    instruction about how
    you can help
    conserve our Home.

    You can see this film
    on Youtube:

    http://youtu.be/jqxENMKaeCU

    ReplyDelete
  8. Row upon row
    of naked humanity -
    surely a different
    way of getting back
    to nature...

    On a beach near the coast
    of Vielle-Saint-Girons is
    one of the greatest naturist
    centers of France.
    The photographer gathered
    a thousand people for this shot.
    Cradle of the naturist movement
    since 1930, France accommodates
    2 million naturist tourists annually,
    from all social strata,
    60 % of whom are from
    its European neighbours.

    The naturists claim a desire
    "to be in harmony with nature."
    The numbers of people
    visiting this beach is dropping,
    as the population from which
    the visitors is drawn is aging.
    France has 8,000 centenarians;
    in 50 years, it is estimated
    there will be 150,000.
    At the end of 21st century,
    people more than 60 years old
    could represent 30%
    of the world population
    (compared to 10% in 1995).
    In all countries, this change
    will have severe repercussions.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Me, too.
    The mere mention
    of Easter Island,
    makes me recall
    of those giant Moaïs statues
    standing in guard
    off the coast of the island.


    This is the volcano
    of Rano Rarak.
    The cult of the giant statues
    came to an end in the 1860s
    when almost the whole of
    the island's population
    was deported and enslaved,
    or struck down by illnesses
    imported by boat
    crews and missionaries.

    The Christianisation of
    the survivors brought an
    end to this Polynesian culture
    that had invented a form of
    undecipherable writing,
    called rongo-rongo.
    At the end of the 19th century,
    there were only 200 inhabitants.
    There are now about
    4000 people living on the island
    on a permanent basis
    with the arrival of new inhabitants,
    at the start of this 21st century.
    Tourism (over 50 000 visitors a year)
    poses new threats for
    the island listed as a
    UNESCO World
    Heritage Site since 1995....

    ReplyDelete
  10. Rightly so -
    your being of
    German descent
    provided you an
    auspicious opportunity
    that had brought
    you at the foot
    of the Austrian Alps.

    The Bavarian king Ludwig II
    built this mock-medieval
    fortress of Neuschwanstein.
    Perched on its rocky spur,
    this jewel of gray granite
    bristling with towers
    and pinnacles draws
    on the realm of fantasy,
    and its extravagant
    architecture inspired
    Walt Disney.

    Ludwig II only spent
    172 days in
    his royal residence;
    The castle of Neuschwanstein
    evoke dreams and fairy tales.
    Now, they are an asset
    to the Bavarian
    tourist industry.
    Bavaria is the
    German Land (state)
    most frequented by tourists,
    attracting almost
    a quarter of
    the country’s visitors.

    From the air, you see
    things you can't
    see from the ground,
    as a whole –
    you really understand
    the impact of man,
    even in a place
    you know well,
    like this one
    in Washington State....



    Agricultural landscape around Pullman, Washington State, United States (46°44’ N, 117°10’ W).

    ReplyDelete
  11. Rightly so -
    your being of
    German descent
    provided you an
    auspicious opportunity
    that had brought
    you at the foot
    of the Austrian Alps.

    The Bavarian king Ludwig II
    built this mock-medieval
    fortress of Neuschwanstein.
    Perched on its rocky spur,
    this jewel of gray granite
    bristling with towers
    and pinnacles draws
    on the realm of fantasy,
    and its extravagant
    architecture inspired
    Walt Disney.

    Ludwig II only spent
    172 days in
    his royal residence;
    The castle of Neuschwanstein
    evoke dreams and fairy tales.
    Now, they are an asset
    to the Bavarian
    tourist industry.
    Bavaria is the
    German Land (state)
    most frequented by tourists,
    attracting almost
    a quarter of
    the country’s visitors.

    From the air, you see
    things you can't
    see from the ground,
    as a whole –
    you really understand
    the impact of man,
    even in a place
    you know well,
    like this one
    in Washington State....



    Agricultural landscape around Pullman, Washington State, United States (46°44’ N, 117°10’ W).

    ReplyDelete
  12. "The numbers of people
    visiting this beach is dropping,
    as the population from which
    the visitors is drawn is aging."


    Yes, Better, I was one of those naturist in France in the 70s. While I never went to Vielle-Saint-Girons, which is not far from France's border with Spain and which has beaches bordering the Atlantic, I would spend several months each year in a place called Cap d'agde, which has its beaches on the Mediterranean and is not far from Marseilles. Here is the story of how I became familiar with this place and my first visit there:

    http://knightstar.multiply.com/journal/item/2

    Even back then, the population at the beaches was more from other European countries than it was from France. And, yes, it seems the naturist population IS aging, partly due the aging population, of course, but also, I believe the young people of today are less inclined toward participation than we were, as a sign of the times, or perhaps cultural change.

    ~M

    ReplyDelete
  13. Rightly so -
    your being of
    German descent
    provided you an
    auspicious opportunity
    that had brought
    you at the foot
    of the Austrian Alps.

    The Bavarian king Ludwig II
    built this mock-medieval
    fortress of Neuschwanstein.
    Perched on its rocky spur,
    this jewel of gray granite
    bristling with towers
    and pinnacles draws
    on the realm of fantasy,
    and its extravagant
    architecture inspired
    Walt Disney.

    Ludwig II only spent
    172 days in
    his royal residence;
    The castle of Neuschwanstein
    evoke dreams and fairy tales.
    Now, they are an asset
    to the Bavarian
    tourist industry.
    Bavaria is the
    German Land (state)
    most frequented by tourists,
    attracting almost
    a quarter of
    the country’s visitors.

    From the air, you see
    things you can't
    see from the ground,
    as a whole –
    you really understand
    the impact of man,
    even in a place
    you know well,
    like this one
    in Washington State...




    Agricultural landscape around Pullman, Washington State, United States

    ReplyDelete
  14. Mad King Ludwig II had a number of castles, besides Neuschwanstein, built.

    At the one in Linderhof, he had commissioned this special structure, apart from the castle proper. Here, he had this ornate boat inside this building, which he used to float across a small pond, from one shore to the other, and act out his fantasies of being a hero who rescued fair maidens from the evil-doers on the opposite shore. I first learned about this, while on a field trip there in elementary school. I remember being so impressed with all the castles' interiors and all their exaggerated gold-encrusted opulence, so prevalent among the royalty of that time.

    ~M

    ReplyDelete